Monthly Archives: October 2017

13TL05

How to use the Acura Tire Replacement and Inflator Kit

Six steps to an inflated tire.

If you’ve landed on this post because one of your Acura’s tires just suffered some damage, don’t worry, we’re going to get through this together. And the good news is that with the Tire Replacement and Inflator Kit, you probably won’t need to labour over a jack and tire iron, wrenching and sweating on the side of the road to take off the flat and put on the spare. The Tire Replacement and Inflator Kit can repair a puncture to the tread of the tire up to the size of a large nail, so as long as the damage wasn’t done to the sides of the tire, there’s a good chance you’ll be on your way to fixing your tire just as soon as you’re done watching this How-to video:

Step 1: Open the kit and read the instructions.

Step 2: Attach sealant hose to valve stem and tighten it.

Step 3: Connect the power cable to the power outlet inside the car.

Step 4: Start the car engine.

Step 5: Turn the dial to the “Sealant” position and push the kit power button. It will now start inflation.

Step 6: Keep your eye on the pressure gauge and inflate the tire to the pressure written on the pressure gauge found on the driver’s side door jam label.

And that’s it! Six steps to an inflated tire. Keep in mind that this is a temporary fix and your speed should be limited to less than 80 kph. It’s also wise to consult your driver’s manual to see your vehicle’s restrictions following tire repairs.

If your tire hasn’t taken any damage, but just needs a bit of air, the kit can also be used like a standard air pump by selecting the “Air” position on the dial.

Because the sealant in the kit can only be used once, be sure to replace your Tire Replacement and Inflator Kit at an Acura parts department, or just give us a call.

 

p

Why your all-season tires won’t cut it in a Canadian winter

The descriptor “all-season” can be a little misleading when it comes to tires, especially if you live in Canada or somewhere that gets a comparably chilly winter. The truth is, all those seasons they’re talking about don’t include a proper snow-and-ice winter.

It’s a matter of simple science, and it has nothing to do with tread. When temperatures dip below 7 degrees C (44 F), the rubber compound in all-season tires becomes much harder, resulting in less traction with the road. Your all-seasons may look pristine, with all sorts bumps and grooves on the tread, but when the thermometer dips, they’ll grow as hard as a hockey puck…and we all know how that performs on ice.

2018 Acura MDX

Even all-wheel-drive vehicles such as the Acura MDX using all-season tires are susceptible to traction loss—the wheels working in concert does aid in getting the vehicle moving from stop, but when it comes time to brake or turn on a patch of snow or ice, the transmission is little help.

Winter tires, on the other hand, are specifically designed to maintain softness in cold temperatures. This gives them the ability to keep contact with the road and provide more braking, accelerating and maneuvering power for your vehicle.

Though we shouldn’t really need another reason, safety isn’t the only argument for winter tires. There’s also the performance factor. Because a vehicle with proper winter tires will accelerate, stop and corner more effectively than a vehicle with all-seasons, it’s quicker in every sense of the word.

 

So when winter throws the inevitable curve ball your way in the form of an icy incline, a three-car-pile up straight ahead, or a just a whole lot of slush and pedestrians this season, ditch the all-seasons and be prepared with a proper set of winter tires.

If you’re in the GTA, we can help with all your tire needs. Drop us a line!